Our Team

Model

Board Members

  • Stanley Plotkin, M.D. (Board Chair)
    Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics
    University of Pennsylvania/Vaxconsult
  • Jose-Maria Fernandez, M.B.A., M.F.
    Managing Partner, Altamar Credit, Altamar Capital Partners LLC
    Former Treasurer, Government of Spain
  • Ian Gust, A.O., M.D.
    Professorial Fellow
    University of Melbourne
  • Kenneth Holroyd, M.D., M.B.A.
    Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Marie-Paule Kieny, Ph.D.
    Director of Research
    Inserm (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)
  • Wayne Koff, Ph.D.
    President & CEO
    Human Vaccines Project
  • Douglas Richman, M.D.
    Director, Center for AIDS Research
    University of California, San Diego

Management Team

Senior Scientific Consultants

  • Pat Fast, M.D., Ph.D.
    Senior Clinical Consultant
  • Andrea Pruijssers, Ph.D.
    Project Manager
    Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Georges Thiry, Ph.D., PMP
    CEO
    Senergues Consult
  • Stacey Wooden, Ph.D.
    Scientific Advisor, Human Vaccines Project
    Director, Global Health Alliance
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Stanley Plotkin, M.D. (Board Chair)
Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics
University of Pennsylvania/Vaxconsult

Stanley Plotkin, M.D., is Emeritus Professor of the University of Pennsylvania, and Adjunct Professor of the Johns Hopkins University. Until 1991, he was Professor of Pediatrics and Microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania, Professor of Virology at the Wistar Institute and at the same time, Director of Infectious Diseases and Senior Physician at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). He maintained laboratories at both CHOP and Wistar.

In 1991, Plotkin left the university to join vaccine manufacturer Pasteur-Mérieux-Connaught (now called Sanofi Pasteur), where for seven years he was Medical and Scientific Director, based at Marnes-la-Coquette, outside Paris. He also has been a consultant to vaccine manufacturers, biotechnology companies and nonprofit research organizations as principal of Vaxconsult.

Plotkin attended New York University, where he received a B.A. degree, and then the State University of New York Medical School in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he received an M.D. degree in 1956. His subsequent career included internship at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, residency in pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital for Sick Children in London and three years in the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the CDC.

He has been chairman of the Infectious Diseases Committee and the AIDS Task Force of the American Academy of Pediatrics, liaison member of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and Chairman of the Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research Committee of the National Institutes of Health.

Plotkin received the Bruce Medal in Preventive Medicine of the American College of Physicians, the Distinguished Physician Award of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the Clinical Virology Award of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, the Richard Day Master Teacher in Pediatrics Award of the Alumni Association of New York Downstate Medical College and the Marshall Award of the European Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

In June 1998, he received the French Legion of Honor Medal; in June 2001, the Distinguished Alumnus Award of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; in September 2006, the gold medal from the same hospital; the Sabin Gold Medal in May 2002; in September 2004, the Fleming (Bristol) Award of the Infectious Diseases Society of America; in May 2007, the medal of the Fondation Mérieux; in 2009, the Finland Award of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and the Hilleman Award of the American Society for Microbiology; and in 2013, the Career Achievement Award from the Association for Clinical and Translational Medicine, as well as the Caspar Wistar Medal of the Wistar Institute of Biological Research. In 2014, Plotkin received the Charles Mérieux Award of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and the Sheikh Hamdan (Dubai) Award for Medical Sciences.

He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 2005, to the French Academy of Medicine in 2007, to the French Academy of Pharmacy in 2013 and to the Thai Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society in 2015.

Plotkin is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the International Society for Vaccines, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the International Society for Vaccines. He holds honorary doctoral degrees from the University of Rouen (France) and the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). Named lectures in his honor have been established at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting, at the International Advanced Vaccinology Course in Annecy, France, and at the DNA Vaccines Society.

A professorship in his name was established at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His bibliography includes more than 700 articles and he has edited several books including the standard textbook on vaccines, now in its 6th edition.

He developed the rubella vaccine now in standard use throughout the world, is co-developer of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine and has worked extensively on the development and application of other vaccines including anthrax, oral polio, rabies, varicella and cytomegalovirus.

Jose-Maria Fernandez, M.B.A., M.F.
Managing Partner, Altamar Credit, Altamar Capital Partners LLC
Former Treasurer, Government of Spain

Jose-Maria Fernandez, M.B.A., M.F., recently joined Altamar, an investment management firm. He will focus on the design, fundraising and management of portfolios of investments in companies. In this position he is also member of the Investment Committee of Alta Life Sciences, a biotech venture fund with a Spanish and European focus launched in 2016.

Prior to his current position, Fernandez was the Director General of the Treasury at Spain’s Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. In this position, he was the Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer of Spain. His responsibilities included the issuance and management of Spain’s Public Debt, its risk and liability management, the Kingdom’s treasury and cash operations, the financing of Spain’s regional public issuers, the Treasury’s IT and Resources management and a multiplicity of other public sector related financing programs.

Fernandez has also been, since 2014 and until December of 2016, a Member of the Board of Directors of the European Investment Bank and a Board Member of CESCE (Spain’s export credit agency). In this position he has evaluated and approved hundreds of investments and financing operations in Europe and across the globe.

Between 2010 and 2013, Fernandez worked at MIT’s Laboratory for Financial Engineering developing securitization models for biotech R&D portfolios and for Kendall Rho LLC, a finance innovation firm. In addition to this, he has substantial experience in capital markets. Prior to this, he ran the Debt Capital Markets Global Origination department for Sovereigns, Supranational and Development Agencies at Credit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank and he worked in, and led for three years, the Funding and Debt Management Department at the Spanish Treasury. Fernandez has also worked for the World Bank as a securities and debt capital markets expert, consulting for emerging country governments on topics related to public debt issuance and financial management strategy.

Fernandez holds an MBA degree from MIT Sloan (Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership), a Masters in Finance degree from the London Business School, a Masters in Portfolio Management degree from I.E.B. and Bachelor’s Degree in Economics and Business from CUNEF (Madrid). He was appointed State Economist and Trade Expert of the Spanish General Government in 1997.

Ian Gust, A.O., M.D.
Professorial Fellow
University of Melbourne

Professor Ian Gust, A.O., M.D., is a medical virologist with a distinguished career in public health, including involvement in the development of vaccines against Hepatitis A and human papillomavirus infection and membership of the International Task Force for Hepatitis B Immunization, which accelerated the introduction of hepatitis B vaccine into routine immunization programs.

Gust has been involved in the development of several licensed vaccines and international efforts to improve vaccine coverage. He is the author of three books and more than 300 papers, holds several patents and has received major awards for his work.

He founded and was the Founding Director of the Burnet Institute, which now employs 600 people in more than 30 counties and is the former R&D director for CSL, a major pharmaceutical company that produces a range of biological products in Europe, the United States and Australia.

Kenneth Holroyd, M.D., M.B.A.
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Kenneth Holroyd, M.D., M.B.A., is Vice President for Technology Transfer at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Medical Director for the Vanderbilt University Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization and Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Medicine.

He has served as the Vanderbilt representative on the board of directors for Cumberland Emerging Technologies, Informatics Corporation of America, DigiChart, Acuitec, Friends in Global Health and the Tennessee Technology Development Corporation.

Before joining Vanderbilt University in 2005, Holroyd was Chief Operating Officer with former NASDAQ company Genaera Pharmaceuticals. He received his medical training at Johns Hopkins University and the National Institutes of Health.

Marie-Paule Kieny, Ph.D.
Director of Research
Inserm (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Marie-Paule Kieny, Ph.D., is currently Director of Research at Inserm (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale) in Paris, where she assists the President on international cooperation. Until June 2017, on a leave of absence from Inserm, she served as the Assistant Director-General for Health Systems and Innovation at the World Health Organization. Kieny also directed the WHO Initiative for Vaccine Research from 2001 to 2010. Key successes under her leadership roles at WHO include the development and licensing of new vaccines against bacterial meningitis; addressing global supply of pandemic influenza vaccine especially in developing countries through technology transfer and manufacturing; vaccines against poverty-related diseases. Such initiatives are continuing priorities of Kieny.

Before joining WHO, Kieny held top research positions in the public and private sectors in France which included Assistant Scientific Director of Transgene S.A. from 1981 to 1988 and Director of Research and Head of the Hepatitis C Virus Molecular Virology Group at the Institute of Virology, (INSERM) from 1999 to 2000.

Kieny received her Ph.D. in Microbiology (1980) and University Diploma in Economics from the University of Montpelier; Diplôme d’Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches from the University of Strasbourg in 1995. She has published over 350 articles and reviews, mainly in the areas of infectious diseases, immunology, vaccinology and health systems.

Kieny has been awarded the title of Chevalier dans l’Ordre National de la Légion d’honneur (Knight in the National Order of the Legion of Honour, France) in 2016; Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite, au titre du Ministère de la Recherche (Knight of the National Order of Merit, under the Ministry of Research, France) in 2000; the Prix Génération 2000-Impact Médecin in 1994 and the Prix de l’Innovation Rhône-Poulenc in 1991.

Wayne Koff, Ph.D.
President & CEO
Human Vaccines Project

Wayne Koff, Ph.D., is the founding President and CEO of the Human Vaccines Project (April 2016-present), a public-private partnership with the goal of decoding the human immune system to accelerate development of vaccines and immunotherapies for major infectious diseases and cancers.

Prior to joining the Project, Koff served as Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President of Research and Development at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) in New York City (1999-2016), leading IAVI’s research and development program. At IAVI, his accomplishments included developing multiple HIV vaccines through clinical trials; establishing state-of-the-art laboratories in the U.S., Europe, India and Africa; conducting the first HIV vaccine trials in India, Kenya and Rwanda; establishing the Neutralizing Antibody Consortium, which identified new, broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against HIV that led to the discovery of novel targets for vaccine design; and establishing a clinical research network in Africa that has conducted seminal studies on HIV pathogenesis, incidence and acute infection.

Koff served as Vice President, Vaccine Research and Development (1992-1998), at United Biomedical Inc. (UBI), where he was responsible for its vaccine R&D program. During his tenure at UBI, the company conducted the first AIDS vaccine clinical trials in the developing countries of the People’s Republic of China, Thailand and Brazil.

He served as Chief of the Vaccine Research and Development Branch (1988-1992), Division of AIDS, at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, where he led the team that established the preclinical and clinical AIDS vaccine development programs for the National Institutes of Health.

He received his B.A. from Washington University and his Ph.D. from Baylor College of Medicine. Koff has published more than 100 scientific papers and edited eight books on vaccine development. An internationally recognized viral immunologist in the field of AIDS vaccine research and development, he has been twice honored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services with the Special Act of Service Award for developing innovative strategies for accelerating global efforts in AIDS vaccine development.

Douglas Richman, M.D.
Director, Center for AIDS Research
University of California, San Diego

Douglas Richman, M.D., is one of the pioneers in HIV research. His laboratory was the first to identify HIV drug resistance. Richman is Distinguished Professor of Pathology and Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, and the Florence Seeley Riford Chair in AIDS Research.

He is Director of the Center for AIDS Research at U.C. San Diego, Director of the U.C. San Diego AIDS Research Institute and staff physician at the VA San Diego Healthcare System.

On Dec. 1, 2015, Richman received the A. Brad Truax Award for his extraordinary achievements in HIV/AIDS research.

Richman trained as an infectious disease physician and medical virologist at Stanford University, the National Institutes of Health and Harvard University before joining the faculty at U.C. San Diego in 1976.

Richman’s laboratory was the first to identify HIV drug resistance. The lab joined two others in identifying latently infected CD4 cells as the obstacle to eradication of HIV with potent antiretroviral therapy. His laboratory also described the dynamics of the neutralizing antibody response to HIV and the rapidity of viral escape and evolution in response to this selective pressure.

Richman’s laboratory currently focuses on the natural history and molecular pathogenesis of HIV in a cohort of acutely infected patients. These studies include the cell mediated and neutralizing antibody immune responses to HIV and the viral escape and evolution in response to these.

Another area of investigation includes the many virological and host determinants of HIV transmission; this knowledge is central for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Additional virologic investigations include studies of HIV drug resistance, and the pathogenetic consequences of virus replication in anatomic compartments.

The major current focus of Richman’s laboratory is the latent HIV reservoir and strategies to achieve eradication of this reservoir. Of particular interest is the development of assays to measure this reservoir in various compartments of the body and in the various subsets of CD4 lymphocytes in order to characterize the targets of intervention strategies and to measure the impact of these interventions reliably.

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Wayne Koff, Ph.D.
President & CEO
Human Vaccines Project

Wayne Koff, Ph.D., is the founding President and CEO of the Human Vaccines Project (April 2016-present), a public-private partnership with the goal of decoding the human immune system to accelerate development of vaccines and immunotherapies for major infectious diseases and cancers.

Prior to joining the Project, Koff served as Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President of Research and Development at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) in New York City (1999-2016), leading IAVI’s research and development program. At IAVI, his accomplishments included developing multiple HIV vaccines through clinical trials; establishing state-of-the-art laboratories in the U.S., Europe, India and Africa; conducting the first HIV vaccine trials in India, Kenya and Rwanda; establishing the Neutralizing Antibody Consortium, which identified new, broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against HIV that led to the discovery of novel targets for vaccine design; and establishing a clinical research network in Africa that has conducted seminal studies on HIV pathogenesis, incidence and acute infection.

Koff served as Vice President, Vaccine Research and Development (1992-1998), at United Biomedical Inc. (UBI), where he was responsible for its vaccine R&D program. During his tenure at UBI, the company conducted the first AIDS vaccine clinical trials in the developing countries of the People’s Republic of China, Thailand and Brazil.

He served as Chief of the Vaccine Research and Development Branch (1988-1992), Division of AIDS, at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, where he led the team that established the preclinical and clinical AIDS vaccine development programs for the National Institutes of Health.

He received his B.A. from Washington University and his Ph.D. from Baylor College of Medicine. Koff has published more than 100 scientific papers and edited eight books on vaccine development. An internationally recognized viral immunologist in the field of AIDS vaccine research and development, he has been twice honored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services with the Special Act of Service Award for developing innovative strategies for accelerating global efforts in AIDS vaccine development.

Ted Schenkelberg, M.B.A., M.P.H.
Chief Operating Officer
Human Vaccines Project

Ted Schenkelberg brings 15+ years’ experience applying business management principles to solve central issues in global health and development bridging both nonprofit and for-profit sectors. He serves as Chief Operating Officer of the Human Vaccines Project with responsibility in the areas business operations, finance and organizational strategy, and as a consultant helped design and implement the organization’s unique business model.

Previously, Schenkelberg worked as a strategic consultant in the global health and drug development space for leading for-profit and nonprofit organizations, including work for a leading Indian drug developer and as an advisor for a major new initiative on antibiotic resistance. He also served for seven+ years at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative where as a Business and R&D Director, he played a key role in building a $50 million global vaccine design program.

Schenkelberg brings strong private sector experience, having worked as a Technology and Health Equity Analyst at Carnegie Capital, an investment firm with more than $1 billion under management and administration. He also has served on the board of directors as Chair of the Audit Finance Committee for the African Services Committee in New York City, the largest U.S. organization supporting African immigrants and asylum seekers. Schenkelberg has an M.P.H. in infectious disease from The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, an M.B.A. in finance and marketing from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a B.A. (honors) from Grinnell College.

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Pat Fast, M.D., Ph.D.
Senior Clinical Consultant

Pat Fast received her M.D. at Michigan State University, is board certified in pediatrics (University of Michigan) and also holds a Ph.D. in immunology from the University of California, Los Angeles. She has worked for more than 20 years on the clinical development of vaccines.

Fast joined the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative from the biotechnology company Aviron, where she oversaw studies of vaccines against influenza and cytomegalovirus. Before that, she led clinical research on HIV vaccines while serving as associate director for vaccines and prevention at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Division of AIDS.

Fast also serves as the Chair for the Vaccine Advisory Committee of Aeras, currently serves on the UNAIDS/WHO Vaccine Advisory Committee and is Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Andrea Pruijssers, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Andrea Pruijssers, Ph.D., is a Senior Project Manager at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (VICTR), and provides project management support for the Human Vaccines Project. She possesses 10 years of experience managing collaborative scientific research projects across the globe. Pruijssers earned an M.S. degree in Cellular and Molecular Biology from Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands, and a Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Georgia where she studied the effects of polydnavirus virulence factors on the invertebrate immune system. Pruijssers conducted her postdoctoral research at the Terence Dermody laboratory at Vanderbilt University Medical Center where she focused on molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis of mammalian reoviruses. As a Research Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Pruijssers led the viral pathogenesis research program at the Dermody laboratory and served as research infrastructure coordinator for the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases for 4 years. She has authored 17 papers and a book chapter.

Georges Thiry, Ph.D., PMP
CEO
Senergues Consult

Georges Thiry, Ph.D., is a vaccinologist, epidemiologist, and Project Management Professional who has guided over 10 vaccine candidates to clinical testing. Thiry received his Ph.D. in Science, Microbiology, and Genetics from the University of Liège in 1988, and has worked for nearly 30 years in translational R&D, project and portfolio management, and field operations. After completing his Ph.D., he worked at Solvay Animal Health on the development of veterinary vaccines. In 1995, Thiry became a Senior Project Manager at GlaxoSmithKline, and in 2000 became Director of Project Management at the International Aids Vaccine Institute (IAVI) where he managed a portfolio of international HIV vaccine R&D projects. As the Director of Portfolio Management, ARVAC, for PATH in India he supervised over 30 programs including the development of vaccines against Rotavirus, Influenza, RSV, Pneumonia, Polio, and Enteric (ETEC, Shigella). In 2013, Thiry served as the Deputy Director General of the International Vaccine Institute in Soul, South Korea and Director of the Dengue Vaccine Initiative, conducting epidemiology in Vietnam, Thailand, and Colombia.

As Senior Clinical Vice President, Head of Infectious Diseases at Hookipa Biotech in Vienna, Austria, Thiry led the translation from pre-clinical to first-in-human trial of a cytomegalovirus vaccine based on a non-replicating viral vector (LCMV). He is currently the CEO of Senergues Consult, a France-based consultancy providing services in vaccine R&D and project and portfolio management. Thiry is also a Certified Project Management Professional, having received accreditation in 2005 from the Project Management Institute.

Stacey Wooden, Ph.D.
Scientific Advisor, Human Vaccines Project
Director, Global Health Alliance

Stacey Wooden is a cross-trained scientist with expertise in human immunology, vaccine development, collaborative research, and global public health. She received her Ph.D. in Human Immunology from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, studying the role of the non-classical MHC (HLA-E) during the antibacterial immune response to Gram-negative enterics.  Wooden was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Maryland Center for Vaccine Development where she studied cell-mediated immunity and correlates of protection in early phase trials of live oral attenuated vaccines for S. flexneri and S. typhi. She has served as a Peace Corps volunteer, Fulbright Scholar, and UNICEF consultant in southern Africa. Wooden has worked as the Chief Scientific Officer for an HIV cure collaboratory based at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and as a Senior Scientific Review Officer managing the peer review of vaccine development and immunotherapeutic proposals submitted to the US Department of Defense. She is also the founder and Director of Global Health Alliance, an organization dedicated to creating and managing international alliances to address the health needs of underserved populations around the world.