Experts

Model

Scientific Steering Committee

  • David Baker, Ph.D.
    Director, Institute for Protein Design (Rosetta Commons)
    University of Washington
  • Maharaj Kishan Bhan, M.B.B.S., M.D., D.Sc.
    Former Government Secretary, India
    Ministry of Science & Technology
  • Nina Bhardwaj, M.D., Ph.D.
    Director of Immunotherapy
    Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine
    Mount Sinai
  • Danilo Casimiro, Ph.D.
    Chief Scientific Officer
    Aeras
  • Giuseppe Ciaramella, Ph.D.
    Chief Scientific Officer
    Valera/Moderna
  • Michel De Wilde, Ph.D.
    MDW Consultant LLC
  • Peter Doherty, Ph.D.
    Nobel Laureate, Peter Doherty Institute
    University of Melbourne
  • Barney Graham, M.D., Ph.D.
    Deputy Director
    Vaccine Research Center
    NIAID, NIH
  • Ian Gust, A.O., M.D. (Human Vaccines Project Board Member)
    Professorial Fellow
    University of Melbourne
  • Jeff Hammerbacher, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Medical University of South Carolina & Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai
  • Kathrin Jansen, Ph.D.
    Senior Vice President, R&D
    Pfizer Inc.
  • Kent Kester, M.D.
    Vice President & Head, Translational Science & Biomarkers
    Sanofi Pasteur
  • Jason J. Paragas, Ph.D.
    Director, Innovation
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
  • Stanley Plotkin, M.D. (Human Vaccines Project Board Member)
    Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics
    University of Pennsylvania/Vaxconsult
  • Bali Pulendran, Ph.D.
    Professor of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Stanford University
    Faculty Fellow at Stanford ChEM-H
  • Rino Rappuoli, Ph.D.
    Chief Scientist & Head External R&D
    GlaxoSmithKline
  • Daniel Rotrosen, M.D. (Federal Liaison)
    Director, Division of Allergy, Immunology & Transplantation
    NIAID, NIH
  • Hanneke Schuitemaker, Ph.D.
    Vice President and Global Head, Viral Vaccine Discovery and Translational Medicine
    Janssen Vaccines
  • Jonathon D Sedgwick, B.SC, Ph.D.
    Vice President and Global Head, Immune Modulation & Biotherapeutics Discovery
    Boehringer-Ingelheim
  • Joann Suzich, M.D.
    Vice President, Infectious Disease & Vaccine Research
    MedImmune
  • Chris Wilson, M.D.
    Director, Discovery & Translational Sciences
    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
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David Baker, Ph.D.
Director, Institute for Protein Design (Rosetta Commons)
University of Washington

David Baker, Ph.D. is a biochemist and computational biologist whose research focuses on the prediction of macromolecular structures and functions. He is the director of the Rosetta Commons, a consortium of labs and researchers that develop the Rosetta biomolecular structure prediction and design program, which has been extended to the distributed computing project Rosetta@Home and the online computer game Foldit. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley and did postdoctoral work in biophysics at University of California, San Francisco. Baker has received numerous awards in recognition of his work, including the AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, the Sackler International Prize in Biophysics, the Overton Prize from the International Society of Computational Biology, and the Feynman Prize from the Foresight Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Sciences.

Maharaj Kishan Bhan, M.B.B.S., M.D., D.Sc.
Former Government Secretary, India
Ministry of Science & Technology

Maharaj Kishan Bhan, M.B.B.S., M.D., D.Sc., currently is National Science Professor at the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, Government of India; President of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry; an Advisor to the World Health Organization and President of National Capital Region Biotech Cluster, Faridabad. He is Former Secretary to the Government of India, Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science and Technology and Founder Chairman of Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council, Ministry of Science and Technology.

Bhan is a Fellow of the Indian National Science Academy, Fellow of the Academy of Sciences, Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and Fellow of the Third World Academy of Science.

He has about 200 research publications in international, peer-reviewed journals, focused on enteric infections, nutrition-infection crosstalk and affordable technologies for prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in children. Some of his contributions to research that impacted health programs include the development of a rotavirus vaccine now in use in India, zinc for treating childhood diarrhea, low osmolality oral rehydration salts, treatment of persistent childhood diarrhea and integrated management of neonatal and childhood illness.

As Secretary of the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India for about a decade, Bhan established many new institutes, clusters and innovation support agencies in order to transform the biotechnology sector in the country. In recognition of his services to India, he was conferred the Padma Bhushan by the Indian government.

Nina Bhardwaj, M.D., Ph.D.
Director of Immunotherapy
Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine
Mount Sinai

Nina Bhardwaj, M.D., Ph.D., is an immunologist who has made seminal contributions to human dendritic cell biology, specifically with respect to their isolation, biology, antigen presenting function and use as vaccine adjuvants in humans. She is the Director of Immunotherapy at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and holds the Ward Coleman Chair in Cancer Research. Bhardwaj brings expertise in human immunology and a variety of immune therapies, having developed toll-like receptor agonist- and dendritic cell-based vaccines for the treatment of both cancer and infection in several investigator-initiated studies.

Bhardwaj is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians, a recipient of the Doris Duke Distinguished Scientist Award and was named one of Scientific American Magazine’s top 50 researchers, receiving the Award for Medical Research in 2004. She received the Fred W. Alt Award for new discoveries in Immunology in 2015 from The Cancer Research Institute. Bhardwaj also is a senior editor of the American Association for Cancer Research’s Cancer Immunology Research journal, senior editor for Frontiers in Immunology and consulting editor for the Journal of Clinical Investigation. She has served on the National Institutes of Health’s Study Sections and multiple advisory councils. This past year, Bhardwaj was chair of the Cancer Immunology Steering Committee of the American Association for Cancer Research. She also has successfully acquired multiple federal and foundation grants and has authored more than 180 publications.

Danilo Casimiro, Ph.D.
Chief Scientific Officer
Aeras

Danilo Casimiro, Ph.D., is the Chief Scientific Officer at Aeras. He joined Aeras from Merck Research Laboratories, where he was Executive Director in the Department of Infectious Diseases and Vaccine Research. He has 20 years of experience in research and development at Merck, where he was responsible for several vaccine and biologics discovery programs in the infectious disease and oncology areas.

Casimiro contributed to the development and licensure of Merck’s papillomavirus vaccines and the selection of 13 novel vaccine candidates (including Merck’s current cytomegalovirus, Ebola, and Dengue vaccine development candidates) and three monoclonal antibodies for clinical development.

He also has served on numerous advisory committees to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Global Health Program, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, HIV Vaccine Enterprise, the National Institutes of Health’s Integrated Preclinical/Clinical AIDS Vaccine Development Program, Human Vaccine Project and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Casimiro currently holds more than 20 patents on vaccine candidates and technologies, and has co-authored more than 100 scientific articles in biological and biomedical research.

Giuseppe Ciaramella, Ph.D.
Chief Scientific Officer
Valera/Moderna

Giuseppe (Pino) Ciaramella is the Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) of Valera LLC, a fully owned venture of Moderna Therapeutics that focuses on the discovery of vaccines and therapeutics for Infectious Diseases using Moderna’s mRNA technology. He joined Moderna in January 2014 as VP of Immunology and Biotherapeutics and was appointed CSO of the newly formed Valera company in October 2014.

Ciaramella has accumulated more than 20 years of drug discovery experience at Moderna, Astrazeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim (BI), Pfizer and Merck, and has held several leadership roles, with a particular focus in the fields of antivirals, immunology and biotherapeutics. Prior to joining Moderna,  Ciaramella led the small-molecules Antiviral Strategy at AZ. At BI, he was VP and Head of Collaborative Research where he had responsibility for external R&D and was a member of the WW Research Leadership Team. Prior to BI, Ciaramella spent 14 years at Pfizer in the UK where he held several Discovery leadership positions, including Head of Biotherapeutics, Head of Antiviral and Head of Lead Discovery. During his career, he has contributed to several INDs, CTAs, development clinical candidates, for both small molecule and biologics, and to the anti-HIV drug Maraviroc (SelzentryTM), which won the USA Prix Galien for Best Pharmaceutical in 2008.

Ciaramella holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from University College London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (UK) and he is a member of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

Michel De Wilde, Ph.D.
MDW Consultant LLC

Michel De Wilde holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the Free University of Brussels and has a long and successful career in Vaccine Research and Development. He currently consults for the vaccine community; he is member of the Boards of VBI Vaccines, Inc., and of the Infectious Disease Research Institute

From 2001-2013, De Wilde was Senior Vice President, Research & Development, at Sanofi Pasteur where he drove the development and licensure of a number of products. Also, Sanofi’s Dengue vaccine was developed under his supervision. Michel was also instrumental in driving the acquisition and integration of two biotech companies: Acambis and VaxDesign.

From 1978 till 2000, De Wilde was at SmithKline Beecham Biologicals (now GSK Vaccines) where he held positions of increasing responsibility. He played a key role in the development of several new vaccines, most notably the recombinant Hepatitis B vaccine, as well as GSK’s Malaria vaccine candidate.

Peter Doherty, Ph.D.
Nobel Laureate, Peter Doherty Institute
University of Melbourne

Peter Doherty, Ph.D., shared the 1996 Nobel Medicine Prize with Swiss colleague Rolf Zinkernagel, for their discoveries about transplantation and “killer” T cell-mediated immunity, an understanding that is currently translating into new cancer treatments. Doherty was the first veterinarian to win a Nobel Prize and also was Australian of the Year in 1997. Still active in research on immunity to influenza, he commutes between St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, and the Peter Doherty Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, where he now spends most of his professional time.

Apart from his scientific output that can be found on PubMed, he is the author of several “lay” books, including “A Light History of Hot Air,” “The Beginners Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize,” “Sentinel Chickens: What Birds Tell us About our Health” and “Our World and Pandemics: What Everyone Needs to Know.”

Passionate about promoting an evidence-based view of reality, his most recent book “The Knowledge Wars” is a “warts and all” view of science for non-scientists, even for people who don’t like science. It also suggests how any thoughtful citizen can bypass the facile propagandists and probe the scientific evidence for and against some of the big issues, like climate change or genetically modified foods.

Barney Graham, M.D., Ph.D.
Deputy Director
Vaccine Research Center
NIAID, NIH

Barney Graham, M.D., Ph.D., is an immunologist, virologist and clinical trials physician whose primary interests are viral pathogenesis, immunity and vaccine development. His work is focused on respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, coronaviruses, HIV and other emerging viral diseases.

After graduating from Rice University, he obtained his M.D. from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 1979. He then completed residency and two chief residencies in internal medicine, a fellowship in infectious diseases and a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tenn., where he rose to the rank of Professor of Medicine with a joint appointment in the Department of Microbiology & Immunology.

In 2000, Graham became one of the founding investigators for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institutes of Health, where he is now the deputy director and chief of the Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory. He oversees the advanced development of VRC candidate vaccine products.

Graham serves as a consultant for organizations involved in vaccine development for HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus and emerging viral pathogens. His laboratory investigates basic mechanisms by which T cells affect viral clearance and immunopathology, explores mechanisms of antibody-mediated viral neutralization and develops vaccine approaches for respiratory virus infections and emerging viral diseases.

Ian Gust, A.O., M.D. (Human Vaccines Project Board Member)
Professorial Fellow
University of Melbourne

Professor Ian Gust, A.O., M.D., is a medical virologist with a distinguished career in public health, including involvement in the development of vaccines against Hepatitis A and human papillomavirus infection and membership of the International Task Force for Hepatitis B Immunization, which accelerated the introduction of hepatitis B vaccine into routine immunization programs.

Gust has been involved in the development of several licensed vaccines and international efforts to improve vaccine coverage. He is the author of three books and more than 300 papers, holds several patents and has received major awards for his work.

He founded and was the Founding Director of the Burnet Institute, which now employs 600 people in more than 30 counties and is the former R&D director for CSL, a major pharmaceutical company that produces a range of biological products in Europe, the United States and Australia.

Jeff Hammerbacher, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Medical University of South Carolina & Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai

Jeff Hammerbacher is an Assistant Professor at the Medical University of South Carolina and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, a founder and the Chief Scientist of Cloudera, an angel investor with his wife Halle Tecco at Techammer, and a board member of CIOX Health and Sage Bionetworks. Jeff was an Entrepreneur in Residence at Accel Partners immediately prior to founding Cloudera. Before Accel, he conceived, built, and led the Data team at Facebook. Before joining Facebook, Jeff was a quantitative analyst on Wall Street. Jeff earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Mathematics from Harvard University.

Kathrin Jansen, Ph.D.
Senior Vice President, R&D
Pfizer Inc.

Kathrin Jansen, Ph.D., is a Senior Vice President for Vaccine Research and Development at Pfizer Inc., and a member of Pfizer’s worldwide research and development leadership team. Jansen oversees a fully integrated, global vaccines research and development organization, with responsibilities ranging from discovery to registration and post-marketing commitments of first-in-class or best-in-class vaccines to prevent or treat diseases of significant unmet medical need.

Her more recent accomplishments include the global licensures of Prevnar 13 to prevent pneumococcal diseases and the development and licensure of Trumenba, the first vaccine licensed in the United States to prevent invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

Before the Wyeth Pharmaceuticals acquisition by Pfizer in 2009, Jansen served as Senior Vice President at Wyeth and on the company’s R&D executive committee and was responsible for vaccine discovery, early development and clinical testing operations.

Jansen also briefly worked at Vaxgen as Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President for Research and Development with responsibility for the company’s late-stage development programs.

Prior to joining Vaxgen, Jansen spent 12 years at Merck Research Laboratories where she directed or supported a number of vaccine efforts, including Merck’s novel bacterial vaccine programs and viral vaccine programs (rotavirus; zoster; and mumps, measles and rubella). Jansen initiated and led the development of Gardasil, the world’s first cervical cancer vaccine.

Jansen received her doctoral degree in microbiology, biochemistry and genetics from Phillips Universitaet, Marburg, Germany, in 1984. Following completion of her formal training, she continued her postdoctoral training at Cornell University working on the structure and function of the acetylcholine receptor. She then joined the Glaxo Institute for Molecular Biology in Geneva, Switzerland, where she focused on basic studies of a receptor believed to be a drug target to treat allergies. Jansen was appointed an Adjunct Professor at the University of Pennsylvania – School of Medicine in 2010.

Kent Kester, M.D.
Vice President & Head, Translational Science & Biomarkers
Sanofi Pasteur

Kent Kester, M.D., currently is Vice President and Head of Translational Science and biomarkers at Sanofi Pasteur. During a 24-year career in the U.S. Army, he worked extensively in clinical vaccine development and led multiple research platforms at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the Department of Defense’s largest and most diverse biomedical research laboratory, which he later led as its commander/director. His final military assignment was as the Associate Dean for Clinical Research in the School of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

Kester holds an undergraduate degree from Bucknell University and an M.D. from Jefferson Medical College. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Maryland and a fellowship in infectious diseases at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

A vaccine researcher with more than 60 scientific manuscripts and book chapters, Kester has played a major role in the clinical development of the malaria vaccine candidate known as RTS, S, having safely conducted the largest number of experimental malaria challenge studies ever attempted to date.

He previously chaired the steering committee of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)/Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, and Kester served as a member of the FDA Vaccines & Related Biologics Products Advisory Committee, the NIAID Advisory Council, and the CDC Office of Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counsellors.

While on active duty in the U.S. Army, Kester also served as the consultant to the Army Surgeon General in both infectious diseases and in medical research and development. In 2015, he was appointed by HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell to serve on the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. Board-certified in both internal medicine and infectious diseases, he holds faculty appointments at USUHS, Georgetown University and the University of Maryland. Kester is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the Infectious Disease Society of America and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Current areas of interest include immune correlates of vaccine-induced protection, human challenge studies and the development of biomarkers to facilitate decision-making in vaccine development.

 

Jason J. Paragas, Ph.D.
Director, Innovation
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Jason Paragas, Ph.D. is the Director for Innovation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Paragas formerly served as the Special Assistant to the Director, Joint Science and Technology Office-CBD, DTRA leading the development of a delivery focused investment strategy. Paragas previously was the Associate Director for Science at the Integrated Research Facility, NIAID, leading the innovation and operationalization of a scientific program for a state of the art translational medicine initiative to investigate high consequence pathogens. Paragas received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and his A.B in Biology from the University of Chicago.

Paragas serves as the focal point for the Biological Application for Advanced Strategic Computing initiative that will enable predictive biology for national and global security through multi-scale simulation of complex biology. He is responsible for leading a multi-disciplinary team from Global Security, Computation, Engineering, and Physical and Life Sciences to develop a vision and operationalize a strategic plan in collaboration with major academic medical centers, technology companies, and the pharmaceutical industry. He has served on multiple government advisory-panels for national security and the author of peer-reviewed technical manuscripts.

Stanley Plotkin, M.D. (Human Vaccines Project Board Member)
Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics
University of Pennsylvania/Vaxconsult

Stanley Plotkin, M.D., is Emeritus Professor of the University of Pennsylvania, and Adjunct Professor of the Johns Hopkins University. Until 1991, he was Professor of Pediatrics and Microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania, Professor of Virology at the Wistar Institute and at the same time, Director of Infectious Diseases and Senior Physician at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). He maintained laboratories at both CHOP and Wistar.

In 1991, Plotkin left the university to join vaccine manufacturer Pasteur-Mérieux-Connaught (now called Sanofi Pasteur), where for seven years he was Medical and Scientific Director, based at Marnes-la-Coquette, outside Paris. He also has been a consultant to vaccine manufacturers, biotechnology companies and nonprofit research organizations as principal of Vaxconsult.

Plotkin attended New York University, where he received a B.A. degree, and then the State University of New York Medical School in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he received an M.D. degree in 1956. His subsequent career included internship at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, residency in pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital for Sick Children in London and three years in the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the CDC.

He has been chairman of the Infectious Diseases Committee and the AIDS Task Force of the American Academy of Pediatrics, liaison member of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and Chairman of the Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research Committee of the National Institutes of Health.

Plotkin received the Bruce Medal in Preventive Medicine of the American College of Physicians, the Distinguished Physician Award of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the Clinical Virology Award of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, the Richard Day Master Teacher in Pediatrics Award of the Alumni Association of New York Downstate Medical College and the Marshall Award of the European Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

In June 1998, he received the French Legion of Honor Medal; in June 2001, the Distinguished Alumnus Award of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; in September 2006, the gold medal from the same hospital; the Sabin Gold Medal in May 2002; in September 2004, the Fleming (Bristol) Award of the Infectious Diseases Society of America; in May 2007, the medal of the Fondation Mérieux; in 2009, the Finland Award of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and the Hilleman Award of the American Society for Microbiology; and in 2013, the Career Achievement Award from the Association for Clinical and Translational Medicine, as well as the Caspar Wistar Medal of the Wistar Institute of Biological Research. In 2014, Plotkin received the Charles Mérieux Award of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and the Sheikh Hamdan (Dubai) Award for Medical Sciences.

He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 2005, to the French Academy of Medicine in 2007, to the French Academy of Pharmacy in 2013 and to the Thai Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society in 2015.

Plotkin is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the International Society for Vaccines, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the International Society for Vaccines. He holds honorary doctoral degrees from the University of Rouen (France) and the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). Named lectures in his honor have been established at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting, at the International Advanced Vaccinology Course in Annecy, France, and at the DNA Vaccines Society.

A professorship in his name was established at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His bibliography includes more than 700 articles and he has edited several books including the standard textbook on vaccines, now in its 6th edition.

He developed the rubella vaccine now in standard use throughout the world, is co-developer of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine and has worked extensively on the development and application of other vaccines including anthrax, oral polio, rabies, varicella and cytomegalovirus.

Bali Pulendran, Ph.D.
Professor of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Stanford University
Faculty Fellow at Stanford ChEM-H

Bali Pulendran, Ph.D., is the Violetta L. Horton Professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine, and a member of the Institute for Immunology, Transplantation and Infection, and the Departments of Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology at Stanford University. He is also an adjunct professor at Emory University and the Yerkes National Primate Center, and director of the NIH U19 Center for Systems Vaccinology, at Emory University in Atlanta. He received his undergraduate degree from Cambridge University, and his Ph.D. from the Walter & Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia, under the supervision of Sir Gustav Nossal. He then did his post-doctoral work at Immunex Corporation in Seattle. Pulendran is a world leader on understanding the mechanisms by which the innate immune system regulates adaptive immunity and harnessing such mechanisms in the design of novel vaccines. More recently, his laboratory pioneered the use of systems biological approaches to predicting the efficacy of vaccines, and deciphering new correlates of protection against infectious diseases. Pulendran’s research is published in front line journals such as Nature, Science, Cell, Nature Medicine, and Nature Immunology. Furthermore, Pulendran is the recipient of numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health, and from The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, serves on many editorial boards, and is the recipient of two concurrent MERIT awards from the National Institutes of Health, as well as the 2011 Albert. E. Levy Award, 2011 Paper of the year award by the International Society for Vaccines.

Rino Rappuoli, Ph.D.
Chief Scientist & Head External R&D
GlaxoSmithKline

Rino Rappuoli, Ph.D., is Chief Scientist and Head external R&D at GSK Vaccines and is based in Siena, Italy. He earned his Ph.D. in biological sciences at the University of Siena and has served as visiting scientist at Rockefeller University in New York and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Prior to his present position, he was Head of R&D at Sclavo, Head of Vaccine Research and Chief Scientific Officer at Chiron Corp. and then Global Head of R&D at Novartis Vaccines.

His team developed CRM197 used in H.influenzae, N.menngitidis and pneumococcus vaccines; an acellular vaccine against pertussis containing a genetically detoxified pertussis toxin; the first conjugate vaccines against meningococcus; the MF59 adjuvant for influenza; and the genome-derived vaccine against meningococcus B.

Rappuoli is an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the European Molecular Biology Organization. His awards include: Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize (1991), the Gold Medal by the Italian President (2005) and the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal (2009). In 2013, he was nominated third most influential person worldwide in the field of vaccines (Terrapin). In 2015, he was awarded Fellowship of Imperial College Faculty of Medicine London and the Maurice Hilleman Award.

Rappuoli has introduced several novel scientific concepts (genetic detoxification, 1987; cellular microbiology, 1996; reverse vaccinology, 2000; pan genome, 2005). He has served on the Committee on Identifying and Prioritizing New Preventive Vaccines for Development of the Institute of Medicine.

Daniel Rotrosen, M.D. (Federal Liaison)
Director, Division of Allergy, Immunology & Transplantation
NIAID, NIH

Daniel Rotrosen, M.D., is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation (DAIT), one of the three extramural program divisions of the institute. Under his leadership, DAIT has promoted basic and clinical research to understand the human immune system and test novel approaches to treat and prevent immune-mediated diseases.

During more than a decade, DAIT has established and provided direction for various grant and contract research programs that align well with the goals of the Human Vaccines Project. These include NIAID programs focused on epitope discovery and characterization, adjuvant discovery and early-stage development, and de-convolution of the innate and adaptive immune response to infectious agents and vaccines.

 

Hanneke Schuitemaker, Ph.D.
Vice President and Global Head, Viral Vaccine Discovery and Translational Medicine
Janssen Vaccines

Hanneke Schuitemaker, Ph.D., is the Global Head of Viral Vaccine Discovery and Translational Medicine in the Infectious Disease and Vaccines Therapeutic Area of Janssen Vaccines and also a member of the Global Public Health Senior Leadership team. In addition, she is a Professor in Virology at the Academic Medical Center of the University of Amsterdam (since 2004). She joined Crucell on September 1, 2010, which was acquired by Johnson and Johnson in February 2011.

Schuitemaker is a medical biologist by training, received her Ph.D. in Medicine in 1992 at the University of Amsterdam and worked for more than 20 years on HIV-1 pathogenesis, first at Sanquin (1989-2007), the blood supply foundation in the Netherlands, where since 1998 she was the chair of the department of Clinical Viro-Immunology, and then at the AMC (since 2007), where she was the chair of the Department of Experimental Immunology and a member of the Research Council.

From mid-2003 to mid-2004, she worked as a visiting scientist at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. She successfully trained 25 PhD students, co-authored more than 275 peer reviewed scientific articles and received multiple and prestigious grants.

She is a member of the scientific advisory board of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI).

In her current position, she is responsible for the portfolio of viral vaccine programs that are in the phase of discovery or early development. Most advanced programs in that portfolio are prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine candidates for Multivalent filo, Ebola, HIV, RSV, sIPV and HPV.

Jonathon D Sedgwick, B.SC, Ph.D.
Vice President and Global Head, Immune Modulation & Biotherapeutics Discovery
Boehringer-Ingelheim

Jonathon Sedgwick, B.Sc. (Hons) Ph.D. born Perth Australia, is an Immunologist, educated at the University of Western Australia with post-doctoral education at the University of Oxford UK with Don Mason, Neil Barclay and Alan Williams. His subsequent career included ten years in academic research at the University of Wurzburg Germany, and the Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine, Sydney Australia, six years as Group Director, Immunology, at the DNAX Research Institute, Schering Plough/Merck’s biotech arm in Palo Alto, California, and 11 years with Eli Lilly and Company where he held a number of roles including Chief Scientific Officer, Cancer Inflammation Research; Managing Director and Chief Scientific Officer of Lilly’s Singapore Research Center, and Chief Scientific Officer, Autoimmunity  Discovery Research and Distinguished Research Fellow, Biotechnology and Autoimmunity.

In November 2015, Sedwick joined the German Biopharmaceutical Company Boehringer Ingelheim, as Vice President and Global Head Immune Modulation and Biotherapeutics Discovery Research responsible for immune-modulation research globally covering all therapy areas including immuno-oncology, and for discovery and delivery of biotherapeutic drugs into development for all therapy areas.

Amongst his key contributions to the immunology field was the discovery with colleagues at DNAX of the dominant biological role of the interleukin-23 cytokine in autoimmune inflammation, and through this identifying the IL-17-producing T cell subset, Th17. This work was fundamental in reorienting the autoimmune therapy field towards a focus on therapeutics in the IL-23/Th17/IL-17 axis, with drugs directed to these pathway components now launched (IL-17A inhibitors) and others including IL-23p19 inhibitors in phase 2 and 3 clinical testing across multiple companies. Sedwick has authored or co-authored 120 peer-reviewed, review articles and book chapters.

Joann Suzich, M.D.
Vice President, Infectious Disease & Vaccine Research
MedImmune

Joann Suzich, M.D., currently serves as Vice President of Infectious Disease and Vaccines Research and is responsible for overseeing MedImmune’s research on antibodies and antibody-like molecules for the prophylaxis and treatment of infectious disease, and vaccines for infectious diseases and cancer.

Areas of focus include respiratory viruses (RSV, influenza), serious bacterial infections (S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae) and novel vaccines (RSV, influenza, therapeutic vaccines and oncolytic viruses for cancer). Of the seven candidate drugs delivered by the Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research group during the past six years, four have been awarded fast track status by the FDA.

Previously, Suzich’s team was the first to demonstrate the efficacy of a systemically administered papillomavirus VLP-based vaccine for the prevention of mucosal papillomas in an animal model and developed technology for the scalable purification of human papillovirus (HPV) VLPs used to generate the HPV vaccine.

Chris Wilson, M.D.
Director, Discovery & Translational Sciences
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Chris Wilson, M.D., Director of the Global Health Discovery & Translational Sciences program for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, leads a team that targets fundamental scientific and technological advances in global health that could lead to new ways to prevent, treat and diagnose disease. Wilson joined the foundation in 2009 as Deputy Director, Vaccine Discovery and Human Biology, Global Health Discovery.

Wilson is a pediatrician and immunologist. He joined the faculty at the University of Washington in 1979 in the Infectious Diseases Division of the Department of Pediatrics and later served as head of the Division of Infectious Diseases, Immunology and Rheumatology. In 1989, he became one of the founding faculty members in the new Department of Immunology, and served as Chairman of the Department of Immunology and head of the graduate program in immunology from 1999-2009.

He has also served on a number of national advisory panels, including the Institute of Medicine Vaccine Safety Review Committee (2001-2004) and the National Advisory Council on Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health and he co-chaired the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ U.S. Immunodeficiency Network Pilot Grant Review Committee. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Wilson received a bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Irvine, and a medical degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital /Harvard Medical School, served in the U.S. Public Health Service and then was a post-doctoral fellow in infectious diseases while performing immunology research at Stanford University.

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